Surprise!

We met in class again this morning and wondered where the students were because we were there and nobody else which is unusual! (there’s usually always a couple of students who are early). Then – ALL 12 students walked in together with a surprise for us – flowers, thank you cards and GREAT gifts: a signed group photo and a lovely scrap book for each of us!Image

Words cannot express how much your thoughtful gesture means to us! THANK YOU for YOUR very important part in making the program so successful. We really appreciate how flexible and willing to go with the flow you all were – even when unexpected things happened. Way to go Team Zambia 2014!! Looking forward to our reunion on September 6th!!!!!! 

Wrap-up meeting

Today was the wrap-up class for Team SLHS in Zambia 2014. We started with the course evaluations, then watched the powerful TED Talk “The Danger of a Single Story” (http://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story). Then we started our discussion: our grand finale pow-wow. The students shared their thoughts including:

  • The program impacted them both professionally and personally
  • Made them realize how privileged they are
  • Several students said they learned so much more than they gave
  • Several also said that they want to go back and their families are surprised at that 
  • They noted the similarities they saw
  • Several also commented on how they had heard horror stories about safety but they had not experienced any such thing
  • They talked about the culture shock of coming back to the US
  • And about the difficulty of talking to others about the program and its impact because others just do not understand
  • Several said that although nervous at the start, they gained confidence in their clinical skills over the course of the program
  • And they appreciated how there was always someone available to help if needed
  • They commented on how they were looked upon as the “experts” and people asked them questions
  • And how AAC was so useful at several of the sites we visited
  • They appreciated the weekend break which allowed them to get back to work the 2nd week rested and ready to go
  • Finally we spoke about the only negative aspect of the program – the driver who was a “little too forward” 

As suggested by Julia and agreed upon, we then decided to go for our “Fountain Run” – a Purdue tradition, but one that I had never heard about despite having been here for 15 years!

The team BEFORE the run:

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Drinking from the lion’s mouth (another tradition apparently)…

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The fearless leader went first!!

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Followed by the rest of the team:

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Ready for Fountain #2:

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After the 2nd fountain:

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Happy it’s done?!

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Confused?

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The soaked program leaders!

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What a team building way to wrap up the program!! 

Travel and reflections….

Thanks to KLM for two more uneventful flights: from Lusaka to Amsterdam, a brief layover there and then on to O’Hare. The team after we retrieved our baggage: Happy to be back…….

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But sad to be departing the group: 10 of the 12 students were picked up by their families at O’Hare:

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The final four who came to West Lafayette on the shuttle bus:

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What an amazing two weeks we have had again! So many people were involved in the success of the program and in helping our team. In addition to everyone in Zambia, some specific people back home that we would like to thank include:

  • Professor Oliver Wendt at Purdue for providing the SPEAKAll app to be used by individuals in Zambia as an alternative mode of communication

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  • Julie Renshaw and Gordon Stowe Inc. for providing supplies such as immittance and OAE tips and otoscope specula and loaner equipment to use for our screenings
  • Phonak Inc. for providing hearing aid and batteries
  • Clinical Professor Jenn Simpson and the Purdue Audiology Clinic for providing equipment to take to Zambia
  • Purdue University (Dean Liping Cai, David Ayers and others) for providing the Study Abroad and International Learning (SAIL) grant that helped purchase supplies and subsidize student costs for the program

Thoughts of our time in Zambia will remain with us…..the warm and friendly smiles of every Zambian we met……

Isaih at the Mimosa Cafe:

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the inspirational work of the organizations we had the honor and privilege to work with……

the children: typical kids and kids with disabilities from whom we learned so much

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the fun times at Victoria Falls and on safari and at the elephant orphanage….

and all the fun and memorable incidents – some of which I captured on camera :)

The weighing of suitcases and transferring of items to make sure the weight was under 50 pounds!

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Julia and her “jump” photos :)

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The power outage the first night we were there at our welcome dinner!

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Nightly pow-wows and lunch packing in Christi’s room (#16)

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The breakfasts: watermelon, broken toaster one day after a power outage (which thankfully came back to life soon – since this was the NEW toaster purchased during our last trip to Zambia!)

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The mosquito nets :)

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Being little kids :)

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The “gangsta”!

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The team work!

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The “visitors book” – that was a brand new book seemingly started just for us?Image

These signs all around the UNZA campus

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Oliver and his bottle-opening technique!

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Huddling to stay warm on the cool morning we went on safari in Botswana

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The coolest sinks at the lodge in Botswana!

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The butterfly on the hand of a lady on the cruise boat…..

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And Breanne’s attempt to have it come sit on her! :)

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The lilac breasted roller – national bird of Botswana – unfortunately could not get a picture of it in flight when it is even more beautiful!

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Jumping at the banks of the Zambezi

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My first “selfie”!!!

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The fruit and nut lunch on the bus…

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The “disco” bathroom…

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The people crammed into the backs of trucks…

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Jessica being embarrassed :)

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The daily ritual of cutting watermelon at breakfast – this morning with a very small knife given by Damiano!

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The dirt roads and dust clouds!

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The caterpillars for lunch!

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The holding of the python – brave Rachael went first!

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Alexis….not so sure :)

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The funny signs at Kalimba Reptile Farms

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The “prank” on Alyssa – placing stickers on her…

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The making of a snail! New skill…

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The constant search for wifi….

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Meeting Emmie – our driver from last year!

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Our chitenges!

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The triumph of killing a spider!

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The weigh scale in pounds…with a conversion chart to kg above it! (They use kg in Zambia)

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The chicken espetada…

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The children….

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The dessert crepes…

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The winning of the game “2048″ at Lusaka airport while waiting to board!!

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And on that sweet and winning note…..we hope we have the opportunity to do this all over again!

Last day in Zambia….shopping for souvenirs

Today is our last day – how two weeks have flown by!

We had our final pow-wow in the morning and discussed yesterday’s last day at Beit Cure Hospital and the farewell dinner which was much appreciated by all the students. More on that later since I am writing this at the airport in Amsterdam.

After the pow-wow we went for our final lunch in Lusaka at the Mimosa Cafe – the same place where we started. Here with our driver Pearson..

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Then on to Kabwata Cultural village for our final dose of souvenir shopping….

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Successful bargaining for some pretty fun souvenirs :) Breanne and Andrea with baby mobiles….

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We got befriended by a group of children as we waited after our shopping….

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We had a final group dinner at everyone’s favorite restaurant: Mint Cafe and enjoyed dessert crepes: this one a Snickers crepe – yum!

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Back to the lodge and the students received their gifts of the Zambian paper bead necklaces!

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Then at 9pm we loaded the bus with our luggage and it was time to go to the airport. Here we are the airport – a bitter sweet moment as always to leave Zambia after a very short and busy two weeks, but glad to be going home to the families we miss…

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Our last work day!

Our last work day for the SLHS in Zambia 2014 team – we can’t believe it has gone by so quickly!

I started the day with a faux pas – we had decided to leave at 8:15 am this morning instead of 8:30. Well, I finished breakfast and completely forgot about that and was sitting journaling in my room thinking I had a few extra minutes! Until Christi came knocking at my door to ask if everything was OK….. I was so embarrassed at having made everyone wait for me!

We reached the hospital and everyone went to their rotations: Alyssa and Rachael with me in Audiology, Andrea and Kaitlyn in the other Audiology room with Alfred, Kelly and Alexis in Physiotherapy, Amanda and Katie in ENT, Jessica and Julia in the kitchen and Breanne and Rachel between the children’s ward and laundry.

We had a slightly less busy morning in Audiology today but still saw 10 patients with a variety of problems including several children

  • Several children and one teacher from the Breath of Heaven Children’s Village that we had screened on Monday were there! It was nice to see the prompt follow-up that they are receiving!
  • We also saw several young children ranging from 3 months to 3 years who have had fluid in their ears
  • A couple of school-age kids
  • And one older adult

Rachael and Alyssa were quick learners and once again I was impressed with their willingness to try anything including tympanograms and OAE testing even on the youngest children.

Towards the end of the morning we were delighted to hear that the 11-year old girl that we had identified at PCOE was at the Clinic with her mother!!! I had been so disappointed when she did not come yesterday and had texted Alice at PCOE to let her know that the child had not come – I was extra happy to see her! Andrea and Kaitlyn tested her and although her right ear had no usable hearing, she had some residual hearing in her left ear and was ready for a hearing aid fitting! Patson and Andrea made an instant ear mold for her, Andrea pre-programmed one of the hearing aids we had brought (THANKS TO PHONAK FOR THE DONATION!). Then with Patson’s help speaking in Nyanja we were able to fit her with a hearing aid for her left ear. Her reaction was small at first, but as Patson continued to talk to her and ask her questions, she warmed up and chatted a little more. Although we know that she needs time to adjust to her hearing aid and will need follow-up, we were happy to be able to help and hope that she continues to get followed up at Beit Cure and does well at school.

Jessica and Julia (with Kelvin) served lunch at the kitchen today and we had nshima with potatoes, cabbage and meat. We were all asked to sign the visitor’s book at the hospital.

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Then at 14 hours (as they say here for 2pm – I am finally starting to get used to that and we are ready to leave!) – the older lady from the N’Gombe compound who I had tested yesterday came for her hearing aid fitting! I was so happy that she returned! Patson had already made her mold yesterday. This time Andrea and Breanne worked together to get her hearing aid ready with Rachel and Julia observing. Despite coming from the compound, she spoke some English and I was able to chat with her. During our conversation I found out that she had walked all the way from the compound to the hospital – probably more than an hour – in order to save on the bus fare. We also found that she goes to the Roma Assumption Parish – the same church that we went to the first Sunday in Zambia – seems so long ago! And she has only 1 child while 6 others have died. We hear so many such stories, yet the people are happy with what they have and their strong faith allows them to be thankful for what they have rather than despairing for what they don’t have. The similarities to the people in India are remarkable, as I have seen the same attitudes among poor people in India. She was so thankful to us and said, “God Bless you for your help” and gave each of us including Patson a hug before she left. She put her hearing aid in the case and said she would wear it when she went to church. Again – we hope she continues to return to Beit Cure for follow-up.

So at about 3pm we gathered in the waiting room for a wrap-up meeting with the ENT/Audiology staff. Alfred does a great job talking with the team and he spoke about the progress they have made since our last visit:

  • They now have trained Precious to be an audio technician and she is able to do hearing tests and they have added Excildha to their staff. We have all been so impressed with her! She is deaf but uses both sign and spoken language (and speaks 5 languages!). She is so smart, graduated from Munali Secondary School last year (one of the schools we visited last year), and her written English would put others to shame it was so good! Having Excildha at the hospital has allowed them to add a sign component where she is able to teach parents basic sign language, since Deaf kids in Zambia do not have an option of cochlear implantation and are generally sent to schools for the Deaf and use sign language.
  • Alfred also spoke about teams like ours that come for short visits as “visiting parachutes” – we swoop in and leave quickly. The question then remains: are we making a meaningful contribution”. He said “YES”, because we now have young people who will become professionals in the field who are aware of the circumstances and needs in Zambia. Although I agree that in the long run, we hope that we do have more professionals who have a broader world view, our short-term impact on the people of Zambia with hearing and speech problems is just a drop, while the impact on our 12 students is far greater
  • He also spoke about the vision for Zambia: for Beit Cure to become the hub and a center of excellence and training in ENT/Audiology while trying to set up the 10 provincial hospitals with audio technicians who could do basic assessments and ear care

After the usual group photos we also briefly met with Melissa and Tim Ebbers (CEO of the hospital) and I could not leave without saying goodbye to my good friends in the kitchen – Elijah, Kelvin and Mbita. I was sorry I did not have a chance to hang out with them this year and ask about their families as they shared their stories with me last year and I would have loved to follow-up to get updates about their families…

ENT/Audiology team:

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We left for the lodge about 4pm, and tonight is our farewell dinner!

Team ready for the dinner:

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We arrived at Rhapsody’s early at about 5:45 and were seated at our table for 25! Christi and I waited at the entrance to make sure we welcome our guests. We were delighted to have Eric Nelson and Milika Phiri from Special Hope Network (Beth Bailey was ill and unable to come), Mr. and Mrs. Devine from Breath of Heaven Children’s Village, Alfred and Dr. Uta from Beit Cure – it was so nice of her to join us later for a glass of wine even though she had plans for the evening, Pezo Mumbi from PCOE (unfortunately Alice was ill and unable to come), and Mr. Malama from the Mthunzi Center. The only organization from which we had no representation was Cheshire Homes – and we missed them!

After everyone had ordered their food I took a few minutes to offer our sincere thanks to all our community partners. Theses words come from the bottom of my heart:

It really is amazing to be at a table with such a group of inspirational individuals from all these different facilities. It all started about three years ago and I can’t believe that this has been my third trip to Zambia! And the 2nd group of Purdue University students who have had the opportunity to participate.

First and foremost we have to thank Alfred Mwamba at Beit Cure Hospital. Without Alfred’s support none of this would have happened. Special thanks to Dr. Uta, Charity, Evelyn, Patson, Precious, Excildha and all the wonderful staff – everyone from the laundry, kitchen, physiotherapy and children’s ward who so kindly allowed our students to spend time with them and answer their questions.

Andrea, Breanne and Alfred:

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This year we had the opportunity to work at PCOE for 1 ½ days. Thanks so much to Alice, Pezo and Sr. Ornella for organizing our activities and to the pediatricians and other staff for allowing our students the opportunity to observe and ask questions.

Kelly and Pezo:

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Special Hope Network has a special place in my heart – this is my third year working with this organization and I continue to be amazed and inspired by the wirk you do. Eric, Holly and Beth, as well as all the Zambian staff – Milika, Goodson, Diana, Lois, Dennis, Doreen, Mary and others whose names I may have forgotten, but whose dedication to their work I will not forget.

Rachael, Eric Nelson and Rachel:

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Cheshire Homes – my third year working with them also. We learn so much from the wonderful children you work with – their resilience and independence that you instill in them despite their disabilities is inspiring. Thanks to Sr. Petronella, Sr. Cecilia, Ian and all the other staff there.

Thanks to Alfred, we also have two new community partners this year. Breath of Heaven Children’s Village where Mr. and Mrs. Devine opened not only their village but their home to us welcoming us for lunch – we thank you for the opportunity to work with the children at the village.

Mr. Devine from Breath of Heaven Children’s Village and Milika from Special Hope Network:

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And Mr. Malama at the Mthunzi Centre – your work to provide education to the children is so inspiring and we wish you many more successful stories with the children.

 

Mr. Malama

Mr. Malama

We have really enjoyed the warm and friendly smiles and welcome we have received from every Zambian we have met!

Finally, we would like to thank the people back home who have supported us: all the faculty and staff in our department at Purdue University and administrators who have supported the program.

And last, but not least – we thank the students – for your professionalism, your team work, your flexibility and your supportiveness of each other. This program could not be a success without all of your efforts!

Dinner was a huge success – the restaurant and food were great and I had the opportunity to speak individually with each of the community partners who attended. We reached the guest house at 10pm after a long and lovely evening and decided that we would have a pow-wow in the morning since it was so late.

I have to admit that I was very relieved last night and went to bed earlier than I have the past two weeks (11:45pm) – relieved to have coordinated what I think has been another successful SLHS in Zambia program the second time around!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blog entry: Amanda

Today was our first day working at Beit Cure Hospital. I had an amazing time there, and I cannot wait to go back again tomorrow. For my morning rotation, I was in the Children’s Ward. I started off talking with a little boy who was having surgery done on his leg. I later found out after looking through the patient files that he was having surgery to remove a dead bone from his left leg. I asked my roommates what causes bone to die because it seemed so strange that a 7 year old boy needed surgery to remove bone that has died from his leg. After talking with him for a little bit, I walked around the ward and observed some of the doctors and nurses. I observed a girl who had hydrocephalus, and it was quite emotional for me. Before coming on this trip, we learned about hydrocephalus, but now I actually had to put what I learned in the classroom to a real-life person. She was having the shunt to help drain the fluid placed in the afternoon.

For the rest of my time at the ward, I played with a little girl. She was absolutely adorable. She had a left club foot, but she didn’t let that stop her from anything! She ran better than most kids her age, and she even had this car she rode around on, using her feet to push her forward. We blew bubbles together (and finished all the bubbles!) and we just walked around outside with her car. When she got tired I was able to just hold her and I sang her some childhood songs I knew, such as “Row Row Row Your Boat” and “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star.” It’s such a special experience to be able to spend time with kids like her. She truly warmed my heart and I believe she’s an inspiration for everyone with a physical disability. She laughed, ran, played, everything you would expect from a typical 4 year old girl. I think I’ve always had a stereotype about physical disabilities and I just assumed that it would impede them from being ‘normal.’ But that’s not the case at all. Every day I have been surprised here in Zambia by just how determined and inspirational the kids we work with are. We also learned about club foot before coming on this trip, but getting to play with her really put a personal connection onto what I had learned. I was able to learn from her, and add what I learned to my personal knowledge of what I now know to be true about children with physical disabilities; they don’t define disability the same way we do. We think of a disability as prohibiting us from something, whereas they see it as just another trait to their individual selves, something that is possible to overcome, and in no way can stop them from being a kid.

I also had an opportunity to observe the physiotherapist in the morning. For some reason I thought the kids would have been older, and therefore more cooperative with the physiotherapist because they want to improve their mobility. However, the two patients I was able to see were both quite young, around 3 years old, and it was one of the most difficult things to witness. They just cried, screamed, and winced from pain the entire session. I understand that physiotherapy would hurt because you’re trying to stretch out the muscles and help the body move better, but seeing those kids going through so much pain was not something I expected. I can’t imagine how the physiotherapist would have felt having to hold a screaming the child the entire session, knowing that the child is in so much pain.

For lunch we got to have a traditional Zambian meal. I had nshima with lemon herb rice, but they also had beans and cabbage, which I unfortunately didn’t have. It was nice being able to have a traditional meal at the hospital with the other staff. After lunch I was on kitchen duty, which was a ton of fun! I got to meet Elijah and Abel, who showed me how to serve the food, and then afterwards I washed all the dishes. They showed me where everything was in the kitchen, and they told me stories about themselves. One interesting aspect I heard from Abel was that he really wants to go to America. This surprised me at first because we had a conversation earlier about his job, and he told me how much he loved it at Beit Cure and in Zambia. So I asked him why he would want to go to America and he said that it was ‘everybody’s dream’ to go to America. Even when I asked what he would want to do there he just said he would do anything. I thought about why so many people feel driven to go to America, but I could definitely understand. Especailly for those Zambians who grew up in poverty and lived a difficult life, America seems like the perfect place to go, as the ‘American dream’ is something that people across the world strive for. I didn’t know how to feel at the time, but as I reflect on it I just feel sad. If you’re in a place that makes you truly happy, then I can’t imagine why you would want to leave. But for so many of these people, they want out so that they can give a better life for their family. Comparing my life back in America to here, I feel very spoiled, and I didn’t even come from a wealthy family. We take the things we have for granted, not realizing that there are a countless number of people who would give anything for just the opportunity to have the things that we do.

Serving lunch with Elijah

Hearing aid checks!

Hearing aid checks!

 

 

After we finished up in the kitchen, our afternoon shift was over, and it was time to head back to the Zebra Guest House. Beit Cure has definitely been an incredible and eye-opening experience, not only for me, but everyone in our group. I look forward to what is to come tomorrow and end this trip on a great, smiling note!

 

A Day at Beit Cure Hospital

Today was our first full day at Beit Cure Hospital, which is actually our primary community partner. We reached there promptly at 9am as requested, to find the Audiology/ENT waiting room already full of people! Christi and I went in and met Dr. Uta in her office. Alfred was not in his office so I took a few minutes to walk all the students over to their respective rotations: Rachael and Alyssa to the kitchen, Kelly and Andrea to the laundry, Julia and Rachel to Physiotherapy and Amanda and Katie along with Christi to the children’s ward. 

With me and Alfred in Audiology were Jessica and Breanne, and in ENT with Dr. Uta and ENT nurse Charity were Alexis and Kaitlyn. The first person I saw when I walked in was one of the UNZA students in Special Education who we had met on the day we visited campus last week. He had lost his hearing in 1998 at the age of 19 after a bout of malaria which was treated with quinine – a medication that can be toxic to the ear. On that day I had asked him if he had been tested and he said not since 1998 when he had been told that there was nothing that could be done to help him. So I had told him we would be at the hospital and asked him to come for an assessment. I guess I was really hoping that he had some hearing and could be helped – but I was wrong. Precious one of the audio technicians had already assessed him and when I looked at his audiogram it was clear that a hearing aid would not be useful. I felt awful that he had come here upon my recommendation but there was nothing I could do to help. We talked for a few minutes with me writing notes to him – my lack of knowledge of sign language is frustrating at moments like this – and he asked about a cochlear implant. I had to tell him that they were not available in Zambia but that I knew a family that had taken their son to India to get an implant. He asked about anyone who could sponsor him for this as it would be very expensive and I had to tell him that I did not know but would try to find out. It was very sad and reminded me of the teacher I had met last year at the Deaf Bible Baptist School with an identical story. Two smart young men, who in the right circumstances would have had every opportunity to be able to hear and continue to use the spoken language they already had, but given their circumstances have no other option but to use sign language. Life is just so unfair, that some people have so much and others have so little available to them. I did later talk to Alfred about this and asked if he knew of any avenues for help – we will have to discuss this more. But – even if an implant is obtained, who helps with the follow-up care? The re-programming, the repairs if needed, etc. etc. – it is not an easy situation and I wish I could do something…..

 After that I got busy with patients! Breanne was in the new booth with Alfred while I was with Jessica in the older booth that we had used last year. Precious, the new audio technician was with us for some of the time also, especially in the beginning as we got going. Between 10 – 1:45pm Jessica and I saw 11 patients with a wide variety of problems:

  • A 48-year old man who complained of “echoes” in his ear but had normal hearing
  • A 65-year old lady from N’Gombe compound who has had a history of chronic ear disease and is now being referred for a hearing aid. Again I spoke with Alfred to see if she was interested since we have hearing aids available for her. We hope that she returns tomorrow for the fitting
  • A 37-year old lady who got hearing aids 4 years ago – but had a conductive hearing loss – again likely subsequent to ear disease
  • A 1-year old for tympanometry – he got normal results. But , a funny story about this: Both Jessica and I looked at his paperwork and saw the date of birth which read –/–/13. I said “This is an older gentleman” (thinking it was 1913) and somehow Jessica agreed and went out calling for “Mr. ——“ only to have a mother bring in her small child born in 2013 for the test!! It was funny moment in a busy morning!
  • A 20-year old young lady and another 20-year old young man – both with perforated eardrums from chronic ear disease
  • An adult who complained of his left ear being “blocked” who turned out to have a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. We later found out that Dr. Uta did refer him for a CT scan to evaluate his auditory structures
  • Two 20-year olds with unilateral profound hearing losses – it is sad to see so many individual with profound hearing losses for which we have no help to offer
  • And finally a 4-year old and a 7-year old for tympanograms

 In the middle of the morning my local phone rang and I answered it to find it was the second UNZA student I had met who had complained of hearing loss, asking if she could come to the hospital. Of course I said yes and she was the last patient we saw. She was one of the patient’s with the profound hearing loss in one ear, and although she knew of the hearing loss since childhood, she was crestfallen when we had to tell her that there was not anything we could do to help her other than to ask her to monitor her good ear.

 Jessica did a fantastic job and was ready to try anything including tympanograms on the kids and counseling of patients! She got better at using the computerized Aurical audiometer as the morning progressed and put up with my quizzing as she was testing patients! We were the last ones to get to lunch – it was nice to see Elijah in the kitchen briefly and I got my rice, beans and cabbage served by our kitchen volunteers Katie and and Amanda and had a quick lunch. 

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Rabecca (Jessica’s UNZA buddy) stopped to say hello wearing her Purdue shirt!!! She had come to the hospital to see a family member and met up with Jessica – it is so nice to see the student buddies getting along together and having so many similarities in their lives despite being half way across the world from each other.

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After lunch, the afternoon was rather quiet with an empty waiting room! There were a few patients for Dr. Uta and a couple for Alfred. I asked Patson if he needed any help and he gave us the job of testing and sorting donated hearing aids, which we readily started.

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Once the students were doing that I had the opportunity to walk over to the ward. I walked through and saw Rachel and Julia sitting at the bedside of 2 girls who were coloring. I also stopped and chatted with a little girl and her mother. The baby (1 year old) was sitting up on her bed, dressed all pretty in a pink dress, tights and shoes. But her bulging head told the story of hydrocephalus – she is scheduled for surgery tomorrow. I stayed and chatted for several minutes – it is hard to see so many kids who are sick and have disabilities that are quite severe. Even after so many years of being a clinician, it affects me and helps me realize how very very fortunate I am to have my children.

 Other students all wrapped up and came to Audiology/ENT and we waited till Dr. Uta finished with her last patient before we left around 4:30pm.

 Back to the lodge and students were craving wifi in the front of the lodge as soon as we returned – even before picking up their room keys!

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A short break and we met at 6pm to go to the Arcades for dinner again – the students all prefer this mall to Manda Hill for food! Christi and I stopped at the Chinese restaurant there (a new one which was not there last year). The menu did not look good (weird pictures and misspellings galore), but we decided to be brave and try it out. The food was actually much better than the appearance of the menu and it was a nice change! We stopped in SPAR again and took a few minutes to get cash and pick up some breakfast food for the students. Katie had mentioned that she had eaten a cheese scone that was delicious, so we picked up some of those and some croissants that we hope they will enjoy. So we were the last to the bus – LATE – but told them that we were sorry but we had been doing a “good deed”.

Back to the lodge, quick pit stop and then to Christi’s room for our pow-wow.

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Tonight’s reflections included two incidents that the students involved handled really well and we are so proud of them for it!

  • One involved a patient telling the student “You need to learn the local language”
  • The other involved a patient who fainted in the Physiotherapy room and the caregiver said that she had fainted because the white people (students) had scared her

We had a discussion about these incidents and once again – kudos to the students who handled themselves professionally through these incidents so early in their budding professional careers!

  • Over my three visits to Zambia, I have only encountered the most warm and friendly people, and so this was a new experience for me to hear about, deal with and discuss….

Other students had many positive things to share:

  • The students in the children’s ward really enjoyed the time spent with the kids
  • Students with Dr. Uta appreciated her having them look in ears through her microscope and also spoke about how she cared for her HIV positive patients reminding them about regular tests
  • The students in the kitchen really enjoyed interacting with the staff there and learned to cook some Zambian food
  • They discussed the power outages during the morning: so the power went out twice this morning affecting Audiology and Laundry the most! Our computerized audiometer had to be shut down both times when the power went out while Laundry had to be stopped and the students chatted with the staff
  • They discussed the interesting cases seen in Audiology – very different from the cases seen at our clinic at Purdue University

At the end of the pow-wow we got a round of applause from the students when we produced the scones and croissants! I was surprised that they were SO appreciative of such a small thing that we did.

Tomorrow will be our last work day and it is hard to believe that two weeks of my third trip to Zambia are almost to the end!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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